Logopedia
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This page only shows primary logo variants.
For other related logos and images, see:
1985–2001 1990–2001 1992–2008, 2000–2001 1993–2000 1994–2001 1995–2001
1985–2001 1990–2001 1992–2008, 2000–2001 1993–2000 1994–2001 1995–2001
1996–2004 1998–2006 1999–2010 2000–2006 2001–2014 2006–2017
1996–2004 1998–2006 1999–2010 2000–2006 2001–2014 2006–2017
2009–2020 2012–2016 2013–2023 2015–present 2021–present
2009–2020 2012–2016 2013–2023 2015–present 2021–present

Windows 1.0/2.x[]

1985–2001[]

Windows logo and watermark - 1985
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Goudy
Launched:  November 20, 1985

Windows 1.0 and 2.0 were the first versions of Windows. These versions were effectively a GUI for MS-DOS. Support ended on December 31, 2001.

Windows 3.0[]

1990–2001[]

Windows 3.0
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Times New Roman
Launched:  December 1990[1]

Windows 3.0 was the version that first introduced Program Manager (predecessor of Start Menu and Taskbar), which made it popular because it was easier to use than 1.0 and 2.0. This logo was seen on some software boxes to denote compatibility with Windows 3.0,[1] but rarely seen anywhere on actual OEM products for Windows 3.0 itself. Windows 3.0's support ended on December 31, 2001.

Windows 3.1[]

1992–2008, 2000–2001[]

Windows 3.0 & 3.1x logo
Designer:  Jeff Boettcher[2]
Jonathan D. Cowles[3]
Julie Wong[3]
Typography:  Times New Roman (modified)
Launched:  April 18, 1992

Windows 3.1 was an updated version of Windows 3.0, with several enhancements to the still DOS-based platform, including improved system stability, expanded support for multimedia, Truetype fonts, and workgroup networking. This logo made a surprise appearance on the Windows ME compatibility. Support for the Windows 3.1x line of operating systems ended on December 31, 2001, except for WFW 3.11 embedded, in which support ended on November 1, 2008.

On Twitter, Microsoft cites Jeff Boettcher as the designer of the original Windows flag.[2] Jonathan D. Cowles, art director at Microsoft from 1991 to 1994, cites himself as designer of the original Windows flag, under the supervision of Boettcher and Julie Wong.[3] The logo was commissioned by Brad Silverberg, a Senior VP at Microsoft. According to Silverberg, the right part of the logo is a window, while the left part of the logo conveys motion. He explained that despite the goal to depict "a window with cool motion effects", the final design ended up resembling a flag; of all the candidates, it was the one he liked the most.[4]

Windows NT 3.1[]

1993–2000[]

Windows NT 3.1 logo
Designer:  Jeff Boettcher
Jonathan D. Cowles
Julie Wong
Typography:  Times New Roman (modified)
Launched:  July 27, 1993

Windows NT 3.1, the first version of Windows NT and first 32-bit Windows, was released on July 27, 1993. This version was based on the 3.1 desktop environment, and came with two editions: Windows NT 3.1 for Workstation and Windows NT 3.1 Advanced Server. Support for Windows NT 3.1 ended on December 31, 2000, along with mainstream support for Windows 95, becoming the first operating system in the Microsoft Windows line to phase out support.

Windows NT 3.5x[]

1994–2001[]

Windows 3.x logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Times New Roman (modified)
Launched:  September 21, 1994

Windows NT 3.5 was released on September 21, 1994, and Windows NT 3.51 was released on May 30, 1995. Like its predecessor, both versions had the same desktop environment from 3.1 and NT 3.1; they also came with Server and Workstation editions. Support for Windows NT 3.5 and 3.51 ended on December 31, 2001 (Windows NT 3.51 Server Edition ended on September 30, 2002).

Windows 95[]

1995–2001[]

Microsoft Windows 95 logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  ITC Franklin Gothic Book / Heavy
Launched:  August 15, 1995

Windows 95 was released on August 24, 1995, with several new features, mainly the graphical user interface, the Start Menu, Windows Explorer, and the taskbar; it was the first operating system in the 9x family. MSN was also launched on the same day. Windows 95 also introduced a redesigned shell based around a desktop metaphor; the desktop was repurposed to hold shortcuts to applications, files and folders, reminiscent of Mac OS. Extended support ended on December 31, 2001 (mainstream support ended on December 31, 2000).

Windows NT 4.0[]

1996–2004[]

Windows NT 4.0 logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  ITC Franklin Gothic Book / Heavy
Launched:  July 31, 1996

Windows NT 4.0 was released on July 31, 1996, and for general availability on August 24, 1996, the same day as Windows 95 OSR 2. This version brought the desktop environment and several features from Windows 95, and had five editions: Workstation, Server, Enterprise Edition, Terminal Server Edition, and Embedded. Extended support ended on June 30, 2004 (mainstream support ended on June 30, 2002).

Windows 98/98 SE[]

1998–2006[]

Microsoft Windows 98 logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  ITC Franklin Gothic Book / Heavy
Launched:  May 15, 1998

Windows 98 was released on June 25, 1998. In May 1999, Microsoft released Windows 98 SE (Second Edition, incorrectly referred to as Windows 99) which fixed certain bugs and problems from Windows 98 but didn't have an official logo. Extended support ended on July 11, 2006 (mainstream support ended on June 30, 2002). This made it the first MS-DOS based version of Windows to be supported to any date other than December 31, 2001.

Windows 2000[]

1999–2010[]

Windows 2000 logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  ITC Franklin Gothic Book / Heavy
Launched:  December 15, 1999

Windows 2000 was first released for business customers on December 17, 1999, and for general availability on February 17, 2000. The system is NT-based, not part of the 9x series, and was used both for server computers and regular computers. Windows 2000 brought many features and improvements from Windows 9x. Extended support ended on July 13, 2010 (mainstream support ended on June 30, 2005).

Windows Me[]

2000–2006[]

Windows ME logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  ITC Franklin Gothic Book / Heavy / Condensed Medium
Launched:  June 19, 2000

Windows ME, released on September 14, 2000, is one of the worst-received versions of Windows, as it was known to crash too often and contained several bugs; as a result, its usage is extremely uncommon among Windows users. ME was also the last version of Windows 9x, which was based on MS-DOS (because of this, it was also the last version to have support for most MS-DOS games). Extended support for Windows ME ended on July 11, 2006, alongside Windows 98 (mainstream support for ME ended on December 31, 2003).

Windows XP[]

2001–2014[]

Windows XP Logo
Designer:  frog design[5]
Casey Potter[6]
Typography:  ITC Franklin Gothic Book / Medium
Launched:  August 24, 2001

Windows XP was released on October 25, 2001, being the first version of the consumer edition based on NT, and introduced a new look and feel to the desktop and the majority of the system in general, with its Luna theme and several new features. It was known to be the longest-supported version of Windows, and was one of the most popular versions of the operating system.

A variant of the logo without "XP" introduced in 2003 used the Segoe typeface.

It was also the last version to have support for MS-DOS. Extended support ended on April 8, 2014 (mainstream support ended on April 14, 2009).

Windows Vista[]

2006–2017[]

Windows Vista
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Segoe UI Regular / Light
Launched:  November 8, 2006

This design officially debuted by July 2005.[7]

Windows Vista was initially released for business customers on November 30, 2006, and for general availability on January 30, 2007. The system was criticized due to high requirements and certain bugs. While Windows Vista was also turned down by many, it introduced new features and design tweaks, including the Aero design language, Sidebar and Widgets, Windows Defender, 3D Task Switcher, Welcome Center, and Games Explorer. Extended support ended on April 11, 2017 (mainstream support ended on April 10, 2012).

Windows 7[]

2009–2020[]

Microsoft-windows-7
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Segoe UI Regular / Light
Launched:  July 22, 2009

Windows 7 was released on October 22, 2009, and was better received than its predecessor, introducing features such as the redesigned taskbar, Windows Snap, HomeGroup, libraries for documents, audio, videos, etc. Mainstream support ended on January 13, 2015, and extended support ended on January 14, 2020. Pro, Enterprise and Ultimate users were able to pay for support until January 10, 2023.

Windows 8[]

2012–2016[]

Windows 8 Logo
Designer:  Pentagram (Symbol)
Wolff Olins
Typography:  Segoe UI Semibold
Launched:  February 29, 2012

Microsoft overhauled their logo again to fit in with the new Metro design language on Windows 8, which removed the colors to become all blue and introduced a slightly modified Segoe font. This logo was unveiled on Windows 8 Consumer Preview, released in February 29, 2012. This logo was designed by Pentagram.

Windows 8 was released on October 26, 2012, and introduced features such as the new Start screen, the Charms, apps, and touchscreen support for devices such as the new Surface tablet. However, it received a mixed reception, with many criticizing it as being unintuitive compared to its predecessor and questioning Microsoft's push to expand the Windows line to touchscreen devices. Windows 8 is known for being the shortest-supported version of Windows, having had its support end on January 12, 2016 (to regain support, users are recommended to upgrade to Windows 8.1, which can be done on this version without an installation disc); but counting Windows 8.1 instead of this, Windows 95 and ME were the shortest-supported versions.

Windows 8.1[]

2013–2023[]

Windows 8.1 logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Segoe UI Regular
Launched:  August 27, 2013

On October 17, 2013, Microsoft released Windows 8.1, which addressed certain criticisms of Windows 8 and also featured certain improvements, such as the improved Start screen, additional Snap views, and the restoration of a visible Start button on the taskbar. This logo was not officially used by Microsoft in advertising (where the default Windows logo was used) nor in the OS (where the Windows 8 logo was used), so it was seldom seen. Mainstream support ended on January 9, 2018, and extended support ended on January 10, 2023.

Windows 10[]

2015–present[]

Windows 10 Logo
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Segoe UI Regular
Launched:  July 29, 2015

Microsoft officially unveiled the first beta version of Windows 10 on September 30, 2014. The first version of the operating system was released worldwide on July 29, 2015. Since then, Windows 10 releases new feature updates twice per year (except in 2016). Windows 10's new features include the return of the Start menu, new versions of Microsoft Store-based apps, multiple desktops, voice assistant Cortana, and the new internet browser Microsoft Edge. New updates include Game Mode, Paint 3D and the new Fluent Design language, which replaced Metro.

Support for Windows 10 is scheduled to end on October 14, 2025. However, Microsoft announced that they will offer paid Extended Security Updates (ESU) support to all versions of Windows 10.[8]

Windows 11[]

2021–present[]

Windows 11
Designer:  Unknown
Typography:  Segoe UI Variable Semi-Bold
Segoe UI Semi-Bold (modified)
Launched:  June 24, 2021

This logo was first leaked on June 15, 2021, and became official when Microsoft announced Windows 11 on June 24 of the same year.

Windows 11 was released on October 5, 2021.

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Third-party support for Microsoft Windows v. 3.0. One to One with Microsoft (December 1990).
  2. 2.0 2.1 Raise your flags! Jeff Boettcher designed the Windows flag logo #wintrivia ^JAS. Twitter (April 26, 2011). Retrieved on April 6, 2022.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Jonathan Cowles. LinkedIn. Retrieved on April 6, 2022.
  4. Tweet by Brad Silverberg on January 25, 2023.
  5. frogdesign.com - The face of the new Windows: real and inviting to the touch
  6. CaseyPotterDesign.com - Windows XP
  7. https://web.archive.org/web/20050724232112/http://www.microsoft.com/windowsvista/default.mspx
  8. Windows IT Pro Blog (microsoft.com) - Plan for Windows 10 EOS with Windows 11, Windows 365, and ESU Retrieved on December 5, 2023.

External links[]


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