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Swissair 1940s Swissair arrow 1950s Swissair logo 50s Swissair logo
194?–195? 195?–196? 196?–1981 1981–2002

Swissair AG (Swiss Air Transport Company Limited, Schweizerische Luftverkehr) was the former national airline of Switzerland from 1931 to 2002 when they files for bankruptcy. The company's assets were acquired by Crossair which promptly formed Swiss International Air Lines.

1931–194?

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Swissair didn't have a set logo at this point and the available logos and liveries varied by plane. The titles also varied.

194?–195?

Swissair 1940s
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In the 1940s, Swissair adopted a consistent identity for its fleet.

195?–196?

Swissair arrow 1950s
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During the 1950s, Swissair introduced the arrow with a new font.

196?–1981

Swissair logo 50s
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During the mid-50s, Swissair changed its logo again, separating the wordmark from the signet.

1981–2002

Swissair logo

Swissair opted to celebrate its 50th anniversary with a new, modern logo and livery. When the new identity was made official, they weren't as strict about the logo and many different variants appeared.

On 31st March 2002, Swissair ceased operations. Many credit their bankruptcy to the September 11th attacks and the rise of budget airlines such as Ryanair and EasyJet. The media also suggested that the directorial board failed to oversee the actions of Philippe Bruggisser (COO 1996–2002) and Eric Honegger (board member 1993–2001 & president 2001–2002). It was alleged that they left behind a convoluted corporate structure and financial commitments – among others a further purchase of 35.5 percent of Sabena's stocks – which would only come to light when Mario Corti was trying to save the airline.

Its successor Swiss International Air Lines launched that year on 1st April.

References

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