Logopedia
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This page only shows primary logo variants.
For other related logos and images, see:
1931–1941 1941–1946 1946–1951 1951–1964 1964–1972 1972–1973 1973–1985
1931–1941 1941–1946 1946–1951 1951–1964 1964–1972 1972–1973 1973–1985
1985–1993 1993–1996 1996–1997 1997–2000 2000–2003 2003–2006 2006–2007
1985–1993 1993–1996 1996–1997 1997–2000 2000–2003 2003–2006 2006–2007
2007–2010 2010–2013 2013–2016 2016–2023 2023–present
2007–2010 2010–2013 2013–2016 2016–2023 2023–present

W2XAB (experimental phase)[]

1931–1941[]

Columbia-W2XAB

WCBS-TV was founded on July 21, 1931 as a experimental TV station under W2XAB, using a mechanical TV system. W2XAB broadcasted four hours a day with its early programming at the coverage of some 80 miles (130 km) from New York City until February 20, 1933. W2XAB returned with an all-electronic CRT system in 1939 from a new studio complex in Grand Central Station, and the transmitter located at the Chrysler Building broadcasting on Channel 2 owned and operated by CBS from that point on. And finally, the station was tested in color on August 28, 1940.

WCBW[]

1941–1946[]

WCBW (WCBS)

Like WNBT which broadcasted on channel 1 at the time, it got licensed and signed-on for the first time on July 1, 1941 with a one hour delay due to technical difficulties. W2XAB changed the callsign to WCBW as the second commercial TV station not only in New York, but in the United States and the Eastern Time Zone which later on October 29 received as a full-time broadcast license.

WCBS-TV[]

1946–1951[]

Wcbs50s-1-

After World War II, the FCC re-allocated both FM radio and television frequencies, forcing WCBW to shut down for one month in February 1946. The frequency of VHF channel 2 was moved from 60–66 MHz (the same frequency which later used by WPTZ in Philadelphia) to 54–60 MHz, and WCBW returned its operations on the same channel with a different frequency for 63 years. Later on November 1, WCBW changed to WCBS-TV, the same call letters from the AM radio to distinguish as "-TV" suffix for New York's Channel 2.

1951–1964[]

Wcbs1956

1964–1972[]

Kcbs3

This logo would later shared with KNXT in Los Angeles and WBBM-TV in Chicago.

1972–1973[]

Wcbs72
Designer:  Lou Dorfsman
Typography:  Unknown
Launched:  Unknown

1973–1985[]

Wcbs2 75-1-

This logo would later shared once again with KNXT in Los Angeles from 1974 to 1984, and WBBM-TV in Chicago from 1976.

1985–1997[]

1985–1993[]

WCBS85

1993–1996[]

WCBS93

1996–1997[]

WCBS96

1997–2016[]

1997–2000[]

WCBS-TV2 (1997)

In May 1997, the station adopted the "CBS 2" branding, along with sister stations KCBS-TV in Los Angeles and WBBM-TV in Chicago, while retaining a unique and distinctive logo. A new, bold and italicized "2" logo, contained in a blue or white slanted box alongside the CBS eye, replaced the long-running Futura "2" used in some form since the 1980s; the overall station branding switched from New York's Channel 2 to simply CBS 2 at the time,

2000–2003[]

WCBS 1

In 2000, Joel Cheatwood, creator of the 7 News format at WSVN in Miami, was appointed as the station's news director. At his suggestion, the newscasts were rebranded from News 2 to the CBS 2 Information Network, using "content partners" such as U.S. News & World Report and VH1. He also gave the newscasts more of a tabloid feel. While considerably watered down compared to Bill Applegate's work at WBBM-TV in Chicago, John Lippmann's work at KCBS-TV in Los Angeles, Fox flagship WNYW, and Cheatwood's work at WSVN – and even compared to WSVN's sister station, WHDH in Boston—it was much flashier than had been seen on New York's "Big Three" affiliates.

2003–2006[]

WCBS (2003)

In 2003, Joel Cheatwood was fired in favor of New York veteran news director Dianne Doctor. The station became simply CBS 2, and gradually phased out the tabloid elements, the Information Network, and Nightcast. The graphics and logo mainly became blue and silver, with that color motif remaining to this day (albeit with the addition of gold) with successive graphics packages, including the last several which have been shared with most of the other stations in the CBS O&O group.

2006–2007[]

CBS 2

2007–2010[]

WCBS-TV logo 2009

2010–2013[]

CBS2-HD

2013–2016[]

WCBS-TV logo

2016–2023, 2023–present (secondary)[]

WCBS 2 2016

This logo is shared with West Coast flagship station KCBS-TV in Los Angeles, which debuted in 2003. This is still the secondary logo after the new logo was launched.

2023–present[]

CBS New York 2022
Designer:  CBS News Creative Services
Typography:  TT Norms
Launched:  March 22, 2023

External links[]

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