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Contents

1957–1958 1958–1960 1961–1967 1967–1970 1970–1976 1976–1979 1979–1982
1957–1958 1958–1960 1961–1967 1967–1970 1970–1976 1976–1979 1979–1982
1982–1997, 1999–present 1986–1993 1993–1997 1997–1999 1999–2004 2004–present
1982–1997, 1999–present 1986–1993 1993–1997 1997–1999 1999–2004 2004–present

WPST-TV

1957–1958

WPST 1957.PNG

Channel 10 signed on as WPST-TV, as the second ABC affiliate in the Miami market; it was originally owned by Public Service Television, Inc., the broadcasting subsidiary of National Airlines. The station took ABC programming from WITV (channel 17, later occupied by PBS member station WLRN-TV), which ceased operations shortly after losing the ABC affiliation.

1958–1960

WPST1959.PNG

1960–1961

Logopedia InfoWhite.svg LOGO MISSING

National Airlines was stripped of its license to operate WPST-TV after being revealed that a Miami attorney named Thurman A. Whiteside, working on behalf of National Airlines, had bribed the former commissioner to obtain the WPST broadcast license.

WLBW-TV

1961–1967

WLBW 1st Logo.png

After the FCC revoked National Airlines' license, a group headed by Cincinnati-area broadcaster L.B. Wilson was awarded a construction permit to build a new television station on channel 10. As part of an FCC-supervised deal, National Airlines sold WPST's non-license assets to Wilson's group, while the FCC awarded a full license to Wilson. WPST signed off for the last time on November 19, 1961. The next day on November 20, channel 10 returned to the air as WLBW-TV (named after the owner's initials). Although it operates under a separate license, what is now WPLG claims the National Airlines station's history as its own.

1967–1970

WLBW Logo.png

In 1969, WLBW and Cincinnati sister station WCKY radio were purchased by the Washington Post Company and became part of its broadcasting subsidiary, Post-Newsweek Stations.

WPLG

On March 16, 1970, the station's call letters were changed to the current WPLG—the calls were chosen in honor of Philip L. Graham, husband of Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham, who committed suicide in 1963.

1970–1976

Wplg old school.jpg

1976–1979

WPLG 1977.jpg

1979–1982

WPLG 10 1979.svg

1982–1997, 1999–present

WPLG-10.svg

This "sunset 10" has been used by the station since 1982, with exception of a brief period of 1997 to 1999.

1982–1986

1986–1993

WPLG TV Miami, Florida 5 30 News Open 1988.jpg

1993–1997

WPLG (1993).svg

1997–1999

WPLG 10 1997.svg

The "sunset 10" was briefly abandoned in favor of this "shadow 10".

1999–2004

WPLG (1999).svg

2004–present

WPLG modern 10.svg

On March 12, 2014, Graham Holdings announced that it would sell WPLG to the BH Media subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway in a cash and stock deal. Berkshire Hathaway and its chairman, Warren Buffett, had been longtime stockholders in Graham Holdings; the sale of WPLG included a large majority of Berkshire Hathaway's shares in Graham Holdings. To maintain continuity following the consummation of the purchase, BH Media entered into agreements with Post-Newsweek Stations (renamed Graham Media Group in July 2014) to continue providing the station with access to its centralized digital media, design, and traffic services after the sale's completion. The sale was finalized on June 30.

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